Recommended Noises: Steve Earle, Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz Festival, Jon Batiste, Logic Moon

Recommended Noises: Steve Earle, Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz Festival, Jon Batiste, Logic Moon

I See Planets by Logic Moon / Photo courtesy Whitelabrecs

Steve Earle - Guy

steve earle guy.jpg

A few years ago rode hard/put-up-wet singer/songwriter Steve Earle (best known to the casual fan for “Copperhead Road”) recorded the album Townes, which was a covers album tribute to songwriter Townes Van Zandt. Somewhat of a sequel, 2019’s Guy is a covers collection tribute to songwriter Guy Clark. Earle and his band The Dukes inhabit Clark’s songs like reclaimed clothes from the Salvation Army. Ragged but right vocals and tightly sloppy grooves make Guy an Americana (or whatever it’s called this week) contender for Album of the Year. CLICK HERE for samples.

Various Artists - Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz Festival 1969

Ann Arbor2.jpg

A brilliant University of Michigan student committee somehow booked most of the biggest blues artists on the planet for the 1969 Ann Arbor Blues and Jazz Festival. Although the fidelity of these recordings isn’t top notch, it’s a minor squabble. The talent gathered here (B.B. King, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Charlie Musselwhite, Otis Rush, Son House, Big Mama Thornton, Lightning Hopkins, T-Bone Walker, etc.) is mind blowing. These artists had been abandoned by their core audience earlier in the decade, but savvy college students who wanted to know where their rock music came from can be heard worshiping the originators at this festival. CLICK HERE for samples.

Jon Batiste - Anatomy of Angels: Live at the Village Vanguard

Jon Batiste.jpg

Known to many as the bandleader of a late night talk show, pianist/composer Jon Batiste is a shining light in modern jazz. This live set presents Batiste’s music in a trio format with bassist Philip Kuehn and drummer Joe Saylor, both providing near-telepathic accompaniment throughout. Batiste originals such as “Dusk Train To Doha” sit perfectly next to standards by Thelonious Monk and Ray Noble, and the sound is exquisite. Jazz has been counted out many times, but Batiste seems intent on putting a few more quarters in the meter. CLICK HERE for samples.

Logic Moon - I See Planets

logic moon.jpg

Logic Moon is the moniker used by German musician Tobias Lorsbach. Although Lorsbach has dabbled other genres, he’s found his niche as a composer of ambient music. The sound of I See Planets is described as “retro-futurism” in a press release, and fans of early Pink Floyd or All India Radio will enjoy these dense soundscapes. Peppered with enough sonic candy to keep your headphones on standby, I See Planets is one of the best soundtracks without a movie you’ll ever hear. CLICK HERE for samples.

Jon Dawson’s album reviews are published weekly by Neuse News. Contact Jon at jon@neusenews.com and www.jondawson.com.

Print Friendly and PDF
Lenoir County debuts emergency notification system

Lenoir County debuts emergency notification system

Reece Gardner: Encouragement is key to a successful life

Reece Gardner: Encouragement is key to a successful life

0